Articles filed under Blogging

New internet-related publications for lawyers.

This is a personal selection of blogs which I feel are of use to lawyers, derived from my 100 Best Legal Blogs page where links to all the blogs will be found.

See also Nick Holmes’ Lawfinder: Blogs which catalogues over 400 law blogs with associated feeds; and, as to what makes a good blog, see his article “Writing out loud” in Legal Web Watch February 2016.

Continuing our series by lawyers on how they use social media for professional and personal development.

I have always been intrigued by the possibilities which electronic communications might open up for judges and lawyers. 30 years ago I led for the Bar in discussions with BT about the usefulness of an early email system called Telecom Gold. As a judge I used FELIX, a bulletin board devised by John Mawhood and Sean Overend, and then I was into the world of the internet and the opportunities for getting our judgments online swiftly via BAILII. I moved from analogue to digital, from slow modems to ultra-fast broadband. What more was there to learn and do?

This article first appeared in Legal Web Watch February 2016. Legal Web Watch is a free monthly email service which complements the Internet Newsletter for Lawyers. To receive Legal Web Watch regularly sign up here.

David Allen Green, aka Jack of Kent, has been writing in the Solicitors Journal about The revival of legal blogging:

10humanrightscases

UK Human Rights Blog arrived on the scene in 2010, when Adam Wagner of 1 Crown Office Row took over Chambers’ longstanding Human Rights Update website. He turned it into an interactive news-based platform and broadened not only its readership but also the range of contributors. It rapidly engaged a wide following, from law students and other legal practitioners, to journalists and editors and members of public alike.

One of the decisions that website owners often need to make these days is whether to allow people to add comments or other content to their website. Of itself, this isn’t a legal issue, but a decision to allow comments or other user content on a website does give rise to legal considerations. These considerations may be relevant to you if, for example, you run or are thinking of setting up a legal blog or forum. They may also be relevant to you if you act for clients on website-related matters.

If you allow others to post content to your site, three broad issues arise:

  • whether you need to obtain a licence to re-use content posted to your site by others for purposes other than reproduction on the site itself (eg you might want to publish helpful comments in an ebook);
  • whether to moderate content and, if so, when; and
  • how to protect yourself from liability arising from material posted to your site that infringes third party rights.

Hands on keyboard

This is the second in a series by lawyers on how they use social media for professional and personal development. Ed.

Social media is a blessing and a curse for those, like me, who use it frequently. The benefits of using social media well are considerable in terms of profile, influence and attracting work. Those that make the best use of social media clearly enjoy doing so, and that enjoyment and their character shine through in their updates. Enjoyment can be found in pontificating to an audience, participating in a community, the immediacy of social media, the (false) sense of omniscience, the serendipity of discovery and in the humour that pervades Twitter in particular.

The problem is that to do social media well is time consuming and requires either or both a natural facility and/or laser focus. If done badly, social media can cause serious and irreparable reputational damage. The more real danger, though, is that done badly social media is a colossal waste of time that could be far better spent.

This is the first in a series by lawyers on how they use social media for professional and personal development. Ed.

I confess to being rather tired of the endless articles about the merits of one social media platform over another. There is no conclusive answer to the question which is best; the best one can say is “it depends …”. That said, I think there is some merit in hearing how different people use the various platforms. Curiosity and an open mind can lead one to see things in a new light. So, without apology, here is my perspective.

I confess to being rather tired of the endless articles about the merits of one social media platform over another. There is no conclusive answer to the question which is best; the best one can say is “it depends …”. That said, I think there is some merit in hearing how different people use the various platforms. Curiosity and an open mind can lead one to see things in a new light. So, without apology, here is my perspective.

I have recently spent some time looking at the blogs on law firm websites. I looked at more than 1,000 blog postings on more than 100 websites. They all had one thing in common: zero visible engagement. Not a single one had had a comment added to it.

I think there are a lot of reasons why people wouldn’t want to comment in a public forum about legal issues that affect them and few reasons why they would, so lack of visible engagement is no surprise at all. Besides, from the firm’s point of view, to start an online conversation with a browser to your site has clear risks and also may lock up valuable fee-earner time. However, the lack of engagement does raise the question: is blogging worthwhile for solicitors?

The UKSC Blog was founded in the summer of 2009 to mark the move of the Law Lords from the Appellate Committee of the House of Lords across the road to the Supreme Court. It was set up by Dan Tench of Olswang LLP and Hugh Tomlinson QC of Matrix Chambers as a blog dedicated to the judgments and other developments concerning the newly established court. The editorial team now comprises half a dozen barristers, solicitors and legal researchers who fit blogging in around their practices.

There are now several hundred legal blogs in the UK, covering every shade of legal writing. A relatively small number seek to provide a high level of ongoing commentary and analysis of developments in the law. We’re asking the founders to profile their blogs.

Nearly Legal started life as a personal, anonymous blog when I was a paralegal in 2006. It had posts on my experience, opinions on recent events and anything law-related that interested me. As I was working in a housing law department, this included reports and views on housing cases, then more and more housing cases.