Articles filed under Blog profiles

Continuing our series by lawyers on how they use social media for professional and personal development.

I have always been intrigued by the possibilities which electronic communications might open up for judges and lawyers. 30 years ago I led for the Bar in discussions with BT about the usefulness of an early email system called Telecom Gold. As a judge I used FELIX, a bulletin board devised by John Mawhood and Sean Overend, and then I was into the world of the internet and the opportunities for getting our judgments online swiftly via BAILII. I moved from analogue to digital, from slow modems to ultra-fast broadband. What more was there to learn and do?

10humanrightscases

UK Human Rights Blog arrived on the scene in 2010, when Adam Wagner of 1 Crown Office Row took over Chambers’ longstanding Human Rights Update website. He turned it into an interactive news-based platform and broadened not only its readership but also the range of contributors. It rapidly engaged a wide following, from law students and other legal practitioners, to journalists and editors and members of public alike.

The UKSC Blog was founded in the summer of 2009 to mark the move of the Law Lords from the Appellate Committee of the House of Lords across the road to the Supreme Court. It was set up by Dan Tench of Olswang LLP and Hugh Tomlinson QC of Matrix Chambers as a blog dedicated to the judgments and other developments concerning the newly established court. The editorial team now comprises half a dozen barristers, solicitors and legal researchers who fit blogging in around their practices.

Nearly Legal started life as a personal, anonymous blog when I was a paralegal in 2006. It had posts on my experience, opinions on recent events and anything law-related that interested me. As I was working in a housing law department, this included reports and views on housing cases, then more and more housing cases.

Sara Williams, Lyndon Harris and I decided to start the UK Criminal Law Blog in the early autumn of 2012. I have been a barrister in chambers for 10 years, Sara is a practising barrister, just out of pupillage, and Lyndon a BVC graduate who is currently the editor of Banks on Sentence. Whilst this was an accidental mix to some extent, the mix of experience seems to work very well.

Free Movement began in 2007. The strapline is that it offers updates and commentary on immigration and asylum law but it also includes a lot of editorial, policy and media comment and has a definite campaigning feel to it.